How to Use Training Films: “Film Tactics” 1945 US Navy Training Film MN-3731

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net/ EXPLAINS THROUGH DRAMATIZED EPISODES HOW TRAINING FILMS SHOULD & SHOULD NOT BE USED BY INSTRUCTORS & DEMONSTRATES SOME RESULTS OF GOOD & POOR TEACHING. Produced by The Jam Handy Organization. Originally…

How to Use Training Films: "Film Tactics" 1945 US Navy Training Film MN-3731

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Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney

more at http://quickfound.net/

EXPLAINS THROUGH DRAMATIZED EPISODES HOW TRAINING FILMS SHOULD & SHOULD NOT BE USED BY INSTRUCTORS & DEMONSTRATES SOME RESULTS OF GOOD & POOR TEACHING.

Produced by The Jam Handy Organization.

Originally a public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jam_Handy
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Henry Jamison “Jam” Handy (March 6, 1886 – November 13, 1983) was an American Olympic breaststroke swimmer, water polo player, and leader in the field of commercial audio and visual communications. Handy was noted for the number of training films that he produced over the years…

Swimming led to him getting a bronze in the 1904 Olympics at St. Louis, Missouri. Twenty years later he was part of the Illinois Athletic Club water polo team at the 1924 Olympics in Paris, France. He broke the record of longest period of time between first and last competition. The team won the bronze at that Olympics…

Handy attended North Division High School in Chicago, and then the University of Michigan during the 1902–03 academic year. During that time he was working as a campus correspondent for the Chicago Tribune when on May 8 he wrote an article about a lecture in the Elocution 2 class given by Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood as a “course in lovemaking.”…

Neither Trueblood nor university President James B. Angell were amused. Ten days after the initial article was published, Handy was suspended…

Tribune editor Medill McCormick… offered Handy a job. Handy worked in a number of departments at the Tribune…

Handy left the Tribune to do further work on corporate communications. He worked with John H. Patterson of National Cash Register, who had used slides to help train workers. With help from another associate, Handy began making and distributing films that showed consumers how to operate everyday products. After World War I broke out, Handy began making films to show how to operate military equipment. During this time the Jam Handy Organization was formed…

The Jam Handy Organization was probably best known for producing the first animated version of the new Christmas story Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer directed by Max Fleischer. After the war, the Jam Handy Organization was contracted as the Chicago-Detroit branch of Bray Productions, creating films for the auto industry, Bray’s largest private client.

General Motors selected Handy’s organization to produce short training films as well as other training and promotional materials. One such film was Hired! – a training film for sales managers at Chevrolet dealerships. This film was eventually featured as two parts on the Mystery Science Theater 3000 episodes Bride of the Monster and Manos: The Hands of Fate. The Mystery Science Theater 3000 team also spoofed other Handy film shorts, including “A Case of Spring Fever” during the Squirm episode, one of the final shows of the original MST3K series. Many films produced by the Jam Handy Organization were collected by Prelinger Archives and may be seen and downloaded at the Internet Archive. Handy appeared swimming in a 1978 commercial asking for the public to support American athletes training for the 1980 Olympic games before the boycott. At the time of his filming he was the oldest living United States Olympic medalist.

Handy also produced films for other companies and for schools. He’s estimated to have produced over 7,000 films for the armed services during World War II. Handy was noted for taking only a one-percent profit on the films, while he could have taken as much as seven percent. He was noted for never having a desk at work, instead using any available work space. Handy’s suits didn’t have pockets, as he thought they were a waste of time…

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